BCBR goes to Bentonville

BCBR goes to Bentonville

One of the best things about riding bikes is how it brings people with a common interest together and connections are created. Last November when BC Bike Race attended ROAM Fest in Sedona, we met 300 other women who are equally passionate about mountain biking, and about exploring new places and new trails.  Karen Stark, our Marketing and Retail Manager connected with Ashley Patterson from Bentonville, Arkansas.  By the end of ROAM Fest, plans were in the works for a riding adventure in Bentonville.  In February, Karen headed south to ride bikes with new friends in new places. Bentonville is the fastest growing mountain bike region on the continent with 2 miles of trail being built every week.  Dirt is trucked in from 30 miles away to build a broad range of flow, technical and machine groomed trails.  The clay doesn’t drain so riding is not possible in the rain but there’s a large enough trail network that you can usually find somewhere to ride.  People are paying attention and it’s estimated that 50% of the riders on the trails are from out of town. With only 3 days to ride, the locals had to choose where to take their out of town guest.  They hit trails in the Coler network as well as The Hub and Slaughter Pen areas.  The Blowing Springs, Back 40 and Little Sugar networks will have to wait for the next time unfortunately.  Too many trail networks with not enough time to ride them all is a great problem to have. The trail development is funding largely by the Walton Family Foundation. The Walton...
Patty McKeeman – 2020 Racer Profile

Patty McKeeman – 2020 Racer Profile

Patty McKeeman is the only woman over 60 on our start line for 2020.  We’re in awe and wanted to learn more about her.  Here’s what she had to say. The first real trail I ever rode was Stanley Gap in the North Georgia Mountains which is still one of the toughest trails in the area.  It was the early 1990’s, and I rode a fully rigid steel bike. I can’t count how many times I crashed, but I fell in love with the sport!! At the time, I was in the middle of an Olympic Sailboarding Campaign but never made it to the Olympics. After the trials, I bought a mountain bike and never looked back. Because of competing so much with sailboarding, I had no desire to compete in MTB races.  I just wanted to be in the woods on my bike. To motivate and challenge myself, I enter a few long-distance events a year. My passion for mountain biking continued to grow through the years as it is a sport that can be done anywhere in the world and isn’t as dependent on the weather as sailing is. Soon after discovering the sport, I found that there were great trails in (believe it or not) central Florida, which are pretty technical. I can ride year-round in our backyard, and now, 25-years later, I’m taking my grandson with me!! I am very nervous about the BCBR for several reasons.  First the logistics of getting there and making all the travel arrangements.  Also all the thoughts that go through my head: am I ready, have I trained enough,...
The Gravel Lot Podcast | Moniera Khan

The Gravel Lot Podcast | Moniera Khan

Our Racer Relations Manager, Moniera Khan, was a guest on The Gravel Lot podcast.  Give it a listen - it will give you a good feel of the vibe at race week. If Dre is the brain behind BC Bike Race, then Race Relations Manager Moniera Khan is the soul. Her love of all things outdoor is only surpassed by her desire to make those around her happy and feel comfortable. We talk with her this week about what new riders can expect during their week at...
Harbour Air making aviation history

Harbour Air making aviation history

Harbour Air, our founding sponsor, made aviation history last week with the first commercial e-plane flight.  We were honoured to be on hand to witness 11 months of work come to fruition. The media, armed with cameras the size of small cars, along with friends and supporters of Harbour Air gathered on the dock to watch the sleek, neon yellow plane take off at 8:30am from the Fraser River. The significant reduction in engine noise over traditional float planes was immediately obvious.  With zero emissions and operational costs reduced by as much as 80%, Greg McDougall, CEO and co-founder of Harbour Air, anticipates switching over the entire fleet eventually. McDougall, who has 8000 hours of flying a de Havilland Beaver piloted the inaugural flight and spoke to crowd after the 10 mile flight. “Today, we made history. I am incredibly proud of Harbour Air’s leadership role in re-defining safety and innovation in the aviation and seaplane industry. Canada has long held an iconic role in the history of aviation, and to be part of this incredible world-first milestone is something we can all be really proud of,” said McDougall. While still in the testing phase, this prototype lays the groundwork for exciting possibilities working with magniX.  Roei Ganzarski, CEO of magniX said, “The transportation industry and specifically the aviation segment that has been, for the most part, stagnant since the late 1930s, is ripe for a massive disruption. Now we are proving that low-cost, environmentally friendly, commercial electric air travel can be a reality in the very near future.” All this innovation means we can expect lower ticket prices...
BCBR Trail Day on the North Shore

BCBR Trail Day on the North Shore

Evidence suggests that the BC Bike Race team like spending time together.  Despite the cold, soggy conditions, a hardy group layered up and met for a morning of trail work on the Richard Juryn trail last Saturday.  The Richard Juryn trail was used for our Prologue course in 2019 and is a local favourite. Under the direction of Pat Podolski of the NSMBA (North Shore Mountain Biking Association) we worked on a few of the corners on the lower section of the trail.  Our mandate was to bolster a couple of the eroded berms, repair general erosion on the trail and build some grade reversals to direct water flow away from the trail.  The latter being key at this time of year so we can keep pedaling through the rain forest all winter long. Buckets upon buckets of dirt had to be hauled over to the trail. It was a muddy mess in the rain but it appears that playing in the mud never loses its appeal, no matter how old you are.  The work was challenging but so rewarding to see the result of our labours. As with all trail work, the last order of work was to leave the forest as pristine as we found it.  We diligently repaired the holes we had dug and replaced the moss where it had been moved.  Only after we got the nod from Pat that the clean up was complete, were we able to head back down the trail.  It’s hard not to feel like one of the seven dwarfs with a shovel or a pick over your shoulder and...